Cooking From Memory ~ A Recipe Journal


Turkey Gravy

Posted in Dressings & Dips,Thanksgiving and Christmas Recipes,Thanksgiving Celebration by Paul Gauche on November 17, 2012

Ingredients ~

  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter (1/4 stick)
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 2 cups turkey drippings, strained (or turkey or chicken stock)
  • ¼ cup heavy cream

 

Method ~

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat until foaming. Add the shallots, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about 15 minutes. Add the flour and whisk constantly until the flour is no longer raw-tasting, about 1 minute. Increase the heat to medium high, add the white wine, scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, and cook until the mixture thickens, about 1 minute.

 

Whisk in the stock or broth and cream and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, stirring occasionally, until slightly reduced and thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh strainer into a small saucepan or serving dish, taste, and season with salt and pepper as needed.

 

Joyce’s Thanksgiving Stuffing

Nearly every family has its favorite stuffing recipe; each a variation on a theme of left-over bread, seasoned and cubed, with further variations and additions. The following recipe has been in my family for three generations. While that sounds impressive, it’s still simply a variation of sage flavored bread cubes with sausage. And really, nothing says Thanksgiving like sage and sausage.

Ingredients ~

  • 16-24 ounce bag of stuffing bread cubes, toasted
  • Giblets from the turkey
  • 1 quart (4 cups) water
  • 1 package Jimmy Dean Sausage, Sage flavored
  • 4 stalks celery, diced
  • 1 large onion, or 2 medium onions, diced
  • 4 Tablespoons butter
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 Tablespoon sage
  • Raisins, craisins or cranberries, optional

Method ~

Add the giblets to 1 quart (4 cups) water with sage and salt. Bring this broth to a boil, then back the heat off, simmering for about 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a sauté pan, brown the sausage, breaking up the meat as you go, 5-7 minutes. Add the onion and celery and continue to cook over low heat until the vegetables are tender, another 5-7 minutes.

When the giblets have been cooked, remove the giblets from the broth and set the giblets aside to cool and reserve the broth. Pull the meat from the neck, finely chop the other giblets and add all of this to the sausage, onions and celery. Cook for 5 minutes.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the bread cubes and the sausage mixture. Toss to combine. Add the fruit is using. Then add the reserved broth and stir until the mixture has a moist consistency. Season to taste with sea salt, fresh ground black pepper and more sage to taste.

Bake in a 350 degree oven for 30 to 45 minutes. Serve with turkey and gravy.

Sweet Potato Gratin

Sweet Potato Casserole

Ingredients for Gratin ~

  • 1 large can sweet potatoes, drained and mashed
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup (1 stick) melted butter
  • 1/3 cup milk

Ingredients for Topping ~

  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup chopped pecans
  • 1/3 cup butter (5 Tablespoons)

Method ~

Combine the ingredients for the Gratin and mix well. Pour this mashed happiness into a well greased 2 quart glass baking or gratin dish and set aside.

Mix the ingredients for the Topping and pour evenly over the Gratin.

Bake in a pre-heated 350 degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and let the Gratin sit for 10-15 minutes to set.

Serving Suggestion ~

To serve this as an hors d’oeuvre, buy a box of frozen pre-baked phyllo cups and fill them with a small, bite-sized scoop of the gratin (you can use a melon baller for this). Remove enough baked gratin and stir it all up to incorporate the topping into the gratin and then fill the cups.  Bake an additional 5 -7 minutes and serve.